In a development which could foster stronger interfaith relations, about 100 Ugandan Christians living in the U.S. have raised about shillings 12.6 million ($3,600) to help renovate a crumbling Namayiba mosque, in Uganda, the New Vision reports.

The mosque, in Nakisunga village was reportedly built about 80 years ago. Geoffrey Nsereko Simple, the chairperson of the organising committee of Uganda North American Association, said he decided to fundraise for the renovation after visiting Namaiba village, where he was born, and saw the dilapidated mosque.

“I was driving around the village when I saw the mosque in a terrible state. This moved me and I promised myself to do something for my community in Uganda after consulting the mosque leaders on what was needed,” Nsereko reportedly said.

The development could be a vital gesture to bolster peace and interfaith solidarity. Photo: npr

The development could be a vital gesture to bolster peace and interfaith solidarity. Photo: npr

Speaking at the ceremony handing over the sh12.6m to the mosque authorities, Nsereko noted: “Everyone expressed concern why me, a non-Muslim, was the one leading the campaign to revamp a mosque. They always asked me: ‘Why not it do for a church. You are a Christian’”.

The fundraising has been welcomed by many and it could be a vital gesture to bolster peace and interfaith solidarity. While religious polarisation is not a major problem in Uganda, the issue remains a problem in parts of Africa. The development could encourage coexistence and religious harmony.

Uganda is largely a Christian country, and the faith makes up about 85 percent of the population while Muslims represent about 12 percent of the population.

Source: New Vision