Junaid Mohammed may be the closest thing Nigerians have to a bipartisan gadfly, an equal opportunity traducer of the country’s rulers. A legislator in the Second Republic, Junaid was a frequent thorn on the side of former President Goodluck Jonathan. He once declared that even if Mr. Jonathan’s father were given the task of evaluating his son’s presidency, the verdict would still come back as a failure.

Junaid was such an effective irritant that Ahmed Gulak, one of Jonathan’s key political advisers, characterized him as a man afflicted with “diarrhea of the mouth.” I, for one, believe Junaid called it right on Jonathan. And that’s why Nigerians would do well to pay attention to what the man is saying about President Muhammadu Buhari.

Many of the most inveterate champions of Buhari the candidate are now willing to own that Buhari the President has been underwhelming on every crucial index and nothing short of disastrous on many indices. The word “change,” which Buhari parlayed into political fuel that propelled him into office, has since become a joke in many Nigerian quarters as unappealing as a four-letter word.

As strategies go, the Buhari administration’s war against corruption is a mess, riddled with contradictions. The only people fooled by the government’s claim that it is operating a policy of zero-tolerance to corruption are those who volunteer themselves to be fooled.

Mr. Buhari’s vaunted credentials as a foe of corruption have been dealt savage blows by his administration’s clear signal that not all corrupt suspects are created equal. Less than two years into the current presidency, the promised total war against the corrupt has morphed into a war against opposition party henchmen as well as military generals deemed close or sympathetic to former President Jonathan.

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Double standards and hypocrisy have become the rules of the anti-corruption game. Erstwhile PDP grubbers who had the instincts to dash across the line to the APC aisle appear wholly sanctified, cleansed of their stench of graft and now wafting the perfume of ethical wholesomeness. And even those indicted for corruption must be bewildered that different standards are applied to different people. In one category are those, unnamed, who reportedly surrendered their loot to the government. There are others, named in media reports, who reportedly returned their lucre. And then there are those who are facing prosecution, denied the option of refunding their loot.

Former Nigerian President Jonathan and President Buhari . Government ZA (Kopano Tlape GCIS)/ Flickr

Former Nigerian President Jonathan and President Buhari . Government ZA (Kopano Tlape GCIS)/ Flickr

As strategies go, the Buhari administration’s war against corruption is a mess, riddled with contradictions. The only people fooled by the government’s claim that it is operating a policy of zero-tolerance to corruption are those who volunteer themselves to be fooled.

And that’s where Junaid’s jeremiads come to play. In an interview last week with Punch, the man x-rayed President Buhari’s unimpressive response to allegations that his top military officer, Tukur Buratai, and Interior Minister, Dambazau, owned astonishingly pricey real estate abroad. And Junaid made the right call when he concluded that President Buhari has displayed “a disastrous sense of judgment.”