Lake Tanganyika is Africa’s oldest lake and this massive body of water is the longest fresh water Lake in Africa.  It is also the second deepest and largest in the world. The name is said to come from the word “Tanganika”, which refers to ‘the great lake spreading out like a plain’, or ‘plain-like lake.

This lake holds 18 percent of the world’s freshwater and it draws its water from at least 50 streams and rivers.

It’s one of the richest aqueous environments in the world and home to an great number of endemic fish supporting at least 280 varieties. Its fish are a critical part of the diet of neighbouring countries.

The lake is also vital source of livelihood to an estimated 10 million people living in the greater basin.

This NASA satellite file image obtained 26 June, 2003, shows Lake Tanganyika in East Africa. According to a new study focused on Lake Tanganyika, climate warming reduces productivity in deep tropical lakes. The results of the study are to be published online in the 26 June Science Express. Photo: ANP/  AFP. NASA

This NASA satellite file image obtained 26 June, 2003, shows Lake Tanganyika in East Africa. According to a new study focused on Lake Tanganyika, climate warming reduces productivity in deep tropical lakes. The results of the study are to be published online in the 26 June Science Express. Photo: ANP/ AFP. NASA

 

Woman doing laundry in Lake Tanganyika with baby on her back. Photo: Flickr/SuSanA Secretariat

Woman doing laundry in Lake Tanganyika with baby on her back. Photo: Flickr/SuSanA Secretariat

 

Rowers on Lake Tanganyika. Photo: Flickr/Brian Harries

Rowers on Lake Tanganyika. Photo: Flickr/Brian Harries

 

Lake Tanganyika. Photo: Flickr/M S

Lake Tanganyika. Photo: Flickr/M S