There is something unique about Ugandan music—it has a conflicted identity. Perhaps, lack of distinctiveness could best explain why Ugandan music is not scaling to the levels of her counterparts in Nigeria, South Africa or Tanzania whose sounds are easily noticeable with their Afro-beat/High life, Kwaito and Bongo flavour respectively.

However, during his performance at the just-concluded Blankets and Wine, folklore artiste Giovanni Kremer Kiyingi told the crowd that people who keep arguing that Ugandan music doesn’t have an identity are not well-researched. “Our music is the xylophone, drums, tube fiddle and all our traditional instruments,” he said.

To shed more light on the identity of Ugandan music, the annual Pearl Rhythm Festival was created in 2012. Local artistes prove to the world that they can play both local and contemporary instruments to produce a unique sound. Originally, according to one of the founders, Suzan Kerunen, the festival was created to provide a stage for a Ugandan sound that was mostly unique to Uganda or Africa; a sound that you might hardly find on radio stations and concerts.

 

Derrick Komakech put up a brilliant performance in Acholi. It was not only about singing and sounds, dancing too had is way in

Derrick Komakech put up a brilliant performance in Acholi. It was not only about singing and sounds, dancing too had its way.

 

Baximba Waves was at its best with their Luganda presentations. Among the many local instruments was the Xylophone

Baximba Waves was at its best with their Luganda presentations. Among the many local instruments was the Xylophone.

 

Michael Kitanda and his brother Happy Kyazze are saxophonists. They thrilled revellers with their singles and duo songs as they gave a Ugandan flavour to Jazz

Michael Kitanda and his brother Happy Kyazze are saxophonists. They thrilled revellers with their singles and duo songs as they gave a Ugandan flavour to Jazz.

 

After the emotional presentation, Kyazze would thrill the audience with yet another piece

After the emotional presentation, Kyazze would thrill the audience with yet another piece.

 

Lilly Kadima made the crowd crazy with her Nyazaala and Akuloga songs. Her presentation was in Luganda

Lilly Kadima made the crowd crazy with her Nyazaala and Akuloga songs. Her presentation was in Luganda.

 

Zoey the storry teller narrated stories in Luganda

Zoey the story teller narrated stories in Luganda.

 

There was something special with Jazz. It attracted much attention

There was something special with Jazz. It attracted much attention.

 

Even the sponsors couldn't remain seated

Even the sponsors couldn’t remain seated.

 

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