More than 20 number of heads of state and country delegation witnessed President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy William Ruto take and sign the oath of allegiance and of due execution of office. Chief Registrar of the Judiciary Anne Amadi administered the oath before Chief Justice David Maraga.

“I swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to the Republic of Kenya; that I will obey, preserve, protect and defend this Constitution of Kenya, as by law established, and all other laws of the Republic; and that I will protect and uphold the sovereignty, integrity and dignity of the people of Kenya”, said Kenyatta.

He also pledged to follow the Constitution and laws of Kenya, “without fear, favour, affection or ill-will”.

In attendance were various Presidents from a number of African  countries including Salva Kiir (South Sudan), Paul Kagame (Rwanda), John Magufuli (Tanzania), Yoweri Museveni (Uganda), Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed (Somali), Ismaïl Omar Guelleh (Djibouti), Hage Geingo (Namibia), Faure Gnassingbé (Togo), Ali Bongo Ondimba (Gabon), Edgar Lungu (Zambia) and Seretse Ian Khama (Botswana).

Read: Kenya’s Supreme Court upholds Kenyatta’s election win

Supporters hold a placard reading “Let’s reason and work together” during the inauguration ceremony of Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta, at Kasarani Stadium in Nairobi, Kenya, on November 28, 2017. Kenyatta vowed to be the leader of all Kenyans and work to unite the country after a bruising and drawn out election process that ended with his swearing-in. / AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBAKenyatta was declared the winner of the October 26 election, garnering over 98 percent of the votes. The opposition leader Raila Odinga and his supporters boycotted the polls.

The Constitution of Kenya 2010 requires the president-elect to be sworn in between 10am and 2pm. Kenyatta was sworn in some minutes before noon.

In his inauguration speech, President Kenyatta thanked all who voted, dedicating the day to them. He also thanked the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) and Supreme Court for the work they did during the elections and election petitions respectively.

Read: David Maraga’s iron will and the IEBC’s “transparency” pledge

He stated that he would incorporate the different ideas brought forward by the opposition during the campaigns.

“I will endeavour to incorporate some of the ideas. This is because the election was not a contest between a good dream and a bad dream. It was a contest between two visions. I believe those who voted for me voted for a better vision,” he said.

Supporters hold a placard reading “Let’s reason and work together” during the inauguration ceremony of Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta, at Kasarani Stadium in Nairobi, Kenya, on November 28, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA

He promised to be the president of all.

“I will be the president for all and I will devote my time and energy to build bridges, unite and bring prosperity to Kenyans,” he said.

The opposition, led by Odinga had planned a rally at Nairobi’s Jacaranda Gardens. The rally was a commemoration of Kenyan citizens who died or were injured as a result of police brutality.

However, the supporters were running battles with anti-riot officers in full gear, who threw teargas at them and at residential estates.

They had sealed off the gardens earlier in the morning to bar NASA supporters from accessing it.

The chaos comes even after Nairobi County Police Commander Japhet Koome warned against the meeting.

Earlier on Tuesday, Odinga spoke to the BBC about today’s event terming it as a ‘coronation’.

“It’s a coronation rather than inauguration. We don’t believe he was legitimately elected as leader of Kenya,” he said to BBC’s Newsday programme.

He further reiterated that there will be no meeting between NASA and the government, even after reports that President Kenyatta had reached out for dialogue.