Everyone has experienced discrimination in their lives. Globally the 1st of March is recognised as a day to promote diversity and that everyone counts. The symbol for Zero Discrimination Day is the butterfly, widely used by people to share their stories and photos as a means to end discrimination and work towards positive transformation. What forms of discrimination have you experienced or seen in your community?

This video by the late South African reggae legend  Lucky Dube could not be more relevant as it is today, enjoy!

This year the theme set by the United Nations is “From Bamako to Baltimore, the right to health belongs to all. On this #ZeroDiscrimination Day let us commit to ensuring everyone, everywhere can access health care safely and live life fully with dignity.”

Read: Uniting to end human rights violations against persons with albinism

While many countries have laws against discrimination and uphold statues on the importance of the dignity of all individuals, discrimination but it’s still a problem in all layers of society in every country in the world. Many countries have and still use discrimination as a way of governing. This day is meant to highlight the negative impacts of discrimination and promotes tolerance, compassion and peace.

The symbol for Zero Discrimination Day is the butterfly, widely used by people to share their stories and photos as a way to end discrimination and work towards positive transformation. Photo: Flickr/ Vinod Rawat

Regardless of age, gender, sexuality, nationality, ethnicity, skin colour, height, weight, profession, education, and beliefs everyone should be treated with respect and dignity. This day comes hot in the heels of xenophobic attacks in South Africa as well as religious and racial segregation of individuals by the U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration.

Read: Only three African countries vote for independent expert on sexual orientation and discrimination

Michel Sidibé, the Executive Director of UNAIDS says, “Discrimination doesn’t just hurt individuals, it hurts everyone, whereas welcoming and embracing diversity in all its forms brings benefits for all.”