The lake is non-subglacial and it was discovered in 1986. Viewing this rare beauty is a not for the feint hearted. The lake is situated at the bottom of the cave at a depth greater than 100m. Getting to the bottom of the cave requires a lot of  courage, planning, ropes, tight squeezes into small tunnels and expertise.

Photo: Namibia Endless Horizons
Photo: Namibia Endless Horizons
During the first expedition, in 1989, two cave divers explored the underground lake of Dragon’s Breath down to 93 m. The filming of the dive was made possible by the extreme visibility of more than 50 m. Photo: Vertical Trip/ Namgrows 2010
During the first expedition, in 1989, two cave divers explored the underground lake of Dragon’s Breath down to 93 m. The filming of the dive was made possible by the extreme visibility of more than 50 m. Photo: Vertical Trip/ Namgrows 2010
Photo: Vertical Trip/ Namgrows 2010
The main shaft is 84 m, then a sloping ledge takes to the lake, 30 m below. Along the NE wall an iron ladder left from the first explorers in late ‘50s is still visible. Photo: Vertical Trip/ Namgrows 2010
Photo: Vertical Trip/ Namgrows 2010
Last shaft before the lake of the Dragon’s Breath cave. Photo: Vertical Trip/ Namgrows 2010
Photo: Vertical Trip/ Namgrows 2010
Middle shaft of the Dragon’s Breath cave. Photo: Vertical Trip/ Namgrows 2010

Photo credits: Vertical Trip/Namgrows 2010