The jollof war is an ongoing battle in which several West African nations claim to be the birthplace of jollof rice. Most prominent in this debate are citizens of Senegal, Sierra Leone, Ghana and Nigeria. There is also disagreement over whose jollof tastes best with several celebrities weighing in on the issue. During a visit to Nigeria in August 2016, Facebook founder,  Mark Zuckerberg,  had Nigerian jollof and glorified the delicacy. On a Facebook live stream he said, “Yesterday, I had jollof rice and shrimp. It was delicious, fantastic. I was told not to compare Nigeria’s jollof rice to that from other neighboring countries.”

Nigerians read Zuckerberg’s comment as an announcement of their jollof supremacy and went on social media to proclaim victory.

Keri Hilson has also dropped a diplomatic comment on the battle for jollof supremacy.

The latest episode in the ongoing saga is a song titled Ghana Jollof  by Sister Deborah.

Every so often, the tension dissipates and just as the world thinks the battle has ended, some comment by a chef, or song or snide tweet leads to another epic show down. A perfect example of this was Chef Jamie Oliver’s ‘interpretation’ of jollof which led to a unified frown from jollof lovers across the continent and world.

Read: On jollof and Jamie Oliver’s disrespect

The latest episode in the ongoing saga is a song titled Ghana Jollof  by Sister Deborah. In the song she disses Nigerian jollof saying ‘it tastes funny’ and proclaims that Ghanaian jollof ‘brings all the boys to the yard’. The popularity of  Ghana Jollof  – which has over 82,000 views on YouTube –  has gotten Sister Deborah on BBC. She was on BBC’s Focus with Cameroonian presenter, Veronique, to talk about the jollof war.

Sister Deborah at Mr Eazi's Life is Easy concert. Photo: Instagram/SisterDeborah
Sister Deborah at Mr Eazi’s Life is Easy concert. Photo: Instagram/SisterDeborah

Sister Deborah whose real name is  Deborah Owusu-Bonsu is a Ghanaian television host, musician, model, academic and graphic artist. She was born on 25 August, 1984 in Ghana to an Ashanti father and a Romanian mother. She is currently a presenter at Ghanaian television network E.tv Ghana.

The popularity of  Ghana Jollof  – which has over 82,000 views on YouTube –  has gotten Sister Deborah on BBC’s Focus.

The video sees Nigerian men – or at least men dressed as Nigerians – enjoying a plate of raw rice, tomato puree and sardines straight from the can, presented to them by men in women clothing who seem to be a depiction of Nigerian women. It is just short of being offensive. This is however not Sister Deborah’s first swig at this special brand of controversial humurous music.

In 2012, she released a song titled Uncle Obama which got the whole world talking because of its suggestive lyrics. The song even got her on CNN where she cleared the air on the misconceptions of Uncle Obama. She did say the song in no way referred to Barack Obama and had nothing to do with politics.

Read: A monkey, a banana and miniskirts: Sister Deborah’s controversial music video

Her other singles are Kikoliko, and Borla. Ghana Jollof was produced by Kuvie. Sister Deborah said the moral of the song was ‘learn how to cook’.

Watch the funny video below: