Posts tagged nigeria


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Defying racism: Afro-Austro Alaba makes his mark

England, France and Belgium have a much longer history of selecting black footballers in their national teams due to a longer historical association with people of African ancestry. But with increased rate of immigration and transnational marriage, the world has become a global village over the years. Because of that, a lot more European countries now have players of colour in their national teams. Any interesting case is Vienna-born David Alaba, a rare breed of a national player for a country with a problem with racism.

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Izu Ojukwu’s ’76 is the best Nollywood picture of 2016

Nollywood has had a preoccupation with the 1960s for some time. In the film October 1, Kunle Afolayan let loose a serial killer in 1960s Nigeria. Biyi Bandele took viewers through the 1967-70 civil war in his adaptation of Chimamanda Adichie’s novel Half of a Yellow Sun. Now Izu Ojukwu has come in their wake to give an account of 1976, a year that felt very much like the Sixties.

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The Gospel According to Olamide

About half a decade ago, rap music in Nigeria was hijacked when local languages removed it from the stranglehold of English. After the untimely death of Yoruba rapper Da Grin, a major crusader for this intellectual capture, the scepter fell into the unlikely hands of a rapper who had been idling around ID Cabasa’s studio. The rapper was Olamide, who released his debut album, Rapsodi, in 2011. Today, Olamide is the most prolific emcee rapping in Yoruba. He has just released The Glory, his sixth studio album in six years.

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The Perpetual Stranger

Teju Cole’s powers of observation and analysis underpin his unique gifts as an essayist, but his forte lies in his ability to be a stranger everywhere. This ability to maintain a certain critical distance from a place when writing about it is central to his skill. In this review of Known and Strange Things, Jeremy Klemin analyses the perpetual stranger in Cole.