Posts tagged nigeria


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Nigeria: Babajide Olatunji’s Photorealistic Art

Babajide Olatunji (27) is a Nigerian visual artist and autodidact who works from Ile Ife and born in Okitipupa. At a glance you would think his art is in fact photography. Olatunji spent many years of self-directed study researching art historical movements and modes of production. Speaking to This Is Africa, Olatunji said his art has always been a part of his life. His earliest influence was watching his elder brother create cartoon characters and smileys. Visualization and creating sketches were to him, the best ways he could understand the world around him.

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The African Drums Festival in Pictures

The African Drum Festival that took place in Ogun State Nigeria was a colourful ceremony that saw more than 20 cultural troupes from about 13 countries in attendance. The festival also drew participants from Haiti and observers from Dallas in the United States. The Kano State contingent emerged overall winners taking with them a whooping N5 million prize money. On today’s GMA we bring you some of the pictures taken by TIA during the festival.

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Defying racism: Afro-Austro Alaba makes his mark

England, France and Belgium have a much longer history of selecting black footballers in their national teams due to a longer historical association with people of African ancestry. But with increased rate of immigration and transnational marriage, the world has become a global village over the years. Because of that, a lot more European countries now have players of colour in their national teams. Any interesting case is Vienna-born David Alaba, a rare breed of a national player for a country with a problem with racism.

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Izu Ojukwu’s ’76 is the best Nollywood picture of 2016

Nollywood has had a preoccupation with the 1960s for some time. In the film October 1, Kunle Afolayan let loose a serial killer in 1960s Nigeria. Biyi Bandele took viewers through the 1967-70 civil war in his adaptation of Chimamanda Adichie’s novel Half of a Yellow Sun. Now Izu Ojukwu has come in their wake to give an account of 1976, a year that felt very much like the Sixties.