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Meet first Ugandan inventor to hold a patent for safety liquid dosing dispenser

Ugandan inventor Philip Mukoza Mpaata has become the country’s first pharmacist to hold a patent for a drug dosing device. Mpaata’s safety dispenser for liquid medicines was early this year patented in the UK. The patent for Syringe Operated System (SYROPS) was granted by the UK patent office on January 26, 2016 with subsequent publication in the UK Patents Journal on February 24, 2016.

Ugandan inventor Philip Mukoza Mpaata has become the country’s first pharmacist to hold a patent for a drug dosing device.

Mpaata’s safety dispenser for liquid medicines was early this year patented in the United Kingdom (UK). The patent for Syringe Operated System (SYROPS) was granted by the UK patent office on January 26, this year with subsequent publication in the UK Patents Journal on February 24, 2016.

Mpaata’s Syrops Design Company Limited (Incorporated in the United Kingdom) applied for the patent in September 2013.

Sketch of the safety liquid dosing dispenser Photo: Espacenet
Sketch of the safety liquid dosing dispenser Photo: Espacenet

The journal says the invention is a device for dispensing liquid such as medication and it comprises a first fluidic connection for a container (14), second fluidic connection for a syringe, and a conduit providing a fluidic pathway linking the two.

According to the Daily Monitor, the device is a new concept for a smart dosing system, which is an advancement from conventional dosing, that is primarily done using syringes and spoons. The device is a breakthrough since the traditional syringe was invented in the 1950s.

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Mpaata told the Daily Monitor that his invention features a closure system, and dispensing device all in one system.

“Current children dosing systems, especially oral syringes and clic-loc closures do not feature a child safety or resistance feature in a single incorporated design, neither do they feature a child safety/resistance mechanism to keep both the syringe and the clic-loc intact as a single unit on the device,” he says.

The patent is set to be renewed in September 2017.

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