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Sudan protests: Out of the frying pan into the fire

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The political situation in Sudan remains tense and precarious. Reports say 128 people have been killed and more than 300 critically injured since June 3, when the military violently dispersed a sit-in camp in the capital Khartoum. Despite the ongoing violence by the military, demonstrators remain resolute to continue with their movement.

The crisis in Sudan began last year when the Sudanese people began protesting to oust their three decade long former president Omar al-Bashir. Their efforts succeeded in April this year when he was successfully forced out. However, the regime was replaced by military rule, which has shown a grave unwillingness to yield power.

Following the ouster of president al-Bashir a three-year transition agreement was made between military leaders and protestors, but a number of issues remained in contention. Protesters continued pushing for a civilian-led transition, and kept up demonstrations with a sit-in held to put pressure on the military. Demonstrators in  Khartoum erected barricades at all entry points to their protest camp.

On June 3, armed men in pick-up trucks broke up a Khartoum protest camp, shooting and beating hundreds of Sudanese demonstrators.

The Transitional Military Council initially denied ordering the bloody attack on civilians but later released a statement backtracking on its involvement in the attack.

“The Transitional Military Council regrets the way the situation unfolded, reaffirming its full commitment to the … safety of the citizens and renews its call for negotiations as soon as possible,” a statement from the the council later said.

Reports say 128 people have been killed and more than 300 critically injured since June 3. Despite the ongoing violence by the military, demonstrators remain resolute to continue with their movement.

Protest leaders earlier this week announce nighttime demonstrations and marches in Khartoum, and across the country.  The “revolutionary escalation” is a new strategy to push the military to hand over power to civilians.

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