Politics

South Africa’s student resolution: #FeesMustFall
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Politics and Society South Africa’s student resolution: #FeesMustFall

This past week, the ANC was dealing with its biggest jolt since it came to power in 1994. With little more than a hashtag, #FeesMustFall, and a lot of healthy outrage, tens of thousands of students across the country and across race and party lines rose up, shut down campuses and stopped examinations, then marched on Parliament and Luthuli House and left the lawns of the Union Buildings smouldering.

Will the New President Save Tanzania?
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Politics and Society Will the New President Save Tanzania?

“There is going to be blood this year if my party doesn’t win,” said the young man Tanzania, and his fellows cheered him on. For a country that is deemed to be a harbour of peace, it is especially scary to hear passionate young people throwing words like blood around in conversation, as if it were nothing. Yes we want change, but what price are we willing to pay for the change? Can this change also be peaceful?

The aftermath of Ebola sparks a rethink about aid
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Politics and Society The aftermath of Ebola sparks a rethink about aid

When will customs officials at airports stop checking your temperature upon arrival from an African destination? In countries like Ethiopia, half a dozen medics in white coats check whether travellers had recently visited Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea. Admittedly, Addis Ababa hosts the headquarters of the African Union (AU), where most of Africa’s 54 member states are represented. And these officials travel a lot.

Africa’s Historic Moment: The birth of a Pan-African Food Security Assembly
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Politics and Society Africa’s Historic Moment: The birth of a Pan-African Food Security Assembly

The ills facing Africa today, including low agricultural productivity under a changing climate to Africa’s socio-economic growth, are widely documented. A consequence of low agricultural productivity, Africa spends more than US$ 35 billion annually on food imports, while food worth up to US$ 48 billion is lost annually in the postharvest and a further 6.6 million tonnes of potential grain harvest – enough to meet annual calorific needs of approximately 30 million people – is written off as productivity loss due to degraded ecosystems.