South Africa

A weak rand is bad news for the poor
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Politics and Society A weak rand is bad news for the poor

Within hours of Zuma’s imprudent announcement that he was appointing as minister of finance an ANC backbencher and former mayor to 200 000 people in the West Rand (until residents burned down his house and chased him out), the South African banking index lost R128 billion in share value (its worst hit since October 2001), and the rand fell by 5.4% to a record low of R15.38 to the dollar. Within days, Zuma had to replace him by reappointing a former minister, Pravin Gordhan, to the job.

Three reasons to smile if you live in South Africa today
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Politics and Society Three reasons to smile if you live in South Africa today

In South Africa, the annual 16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children campaign seldom provides reasons for optimism, let alone celebration. It has, instead, become a time to lament failures and point to the mountain of shattered lives that gender-based violence and violence against children contribute to our national landscape. Yet this year, there are several reasons to celebrate.

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Africans rising SA twins beat odds to become doctors

Twin brothers, Wandile and Wanele Ganya from Khayelitsha township in Cape Town, excelled “in the face of adversity” to graduate as doctors from Stellenbosch University. They had to rely on their mother’s meagre income as a domestic worker, but despite the challenges, the twins pursued an opportunity, which may have once seemed impossible

What are the financial implications of insourcing at UCT?
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Politics and Society What are the financial implications of insourcing at UCT?

On 28 October, University of Cape Town management signed an agreement with NEHAWU (the National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union) which commits the university to employ catering, transport, cleaning, security, and maintenance workers who work at UCT but are employed by outside companies. This promise of “insourcing” came in response to longstanding worker demands, and a period of intense protest in which outsourced workers were joined by many students and some UCT staff.