Cameroon

Cameroon is on the brink of civil war over colonially created barriers
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Politics and Society Cameroon is on the brink of civil war over colonially created barriers

The current turmoil in Cameroon is dire and stems from the Anglophone minority which makes up roughly 20% of the country’s population protesting their forced assimilation into the dominant Francophone society contrary to agreements that date back to the 1960s. The Francophone majority has been trying to quell the minority group’s public show of discontent.

Cartoon: UN condemns violence in Cameroon and commends calls for dialogue
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Politics and Society Cartoon: UN condemns violence in Cameroon and commends calls for dialogue

The death toll has risen in Cameroon’s English-speaking region following clashes between security forces and protesters calling for independence. Rights group Amnesty International says at least 17 people were killed in clashes. People in the region have been pushing for independence from Cameroon after protesting of years of marginalization by the dominant French-speaking region. President Paul Biya on his Facebook page condemned the violence and called for dialogue. The United Nations (UN) Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has also strongly condemned the violence and commended the calls for a discussion on the issues raised by protesters.

Divided Cameroon, relic of colonialism: A reverse Quebec in Africa?
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Politics and Society Divided Cameroon, relic of colonialism: A reverse Quebec in Africa?

The relics of colonialism are dispersed all over the continent, language being one of them. Cameroon’s anglophone population has protested about facing discrimination and under representation over the years. On October 1, the English speaking region declared their independence from Cameroon in peaceful protests. The protests on October 1 ended with more people dead and more division in the country. The crisis which is rooted in colonialism is far from over.

Choosing to Identify as Me
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Politics and Society Choosing to Identify as Me

For some in Cameroon, you are either Anglophone or Francophone, either a victim or a benefactor of linguistic privilege. However, for Monique Kwachou and other ‘citizens of the 11th region’ who straddle the linguistic divide, the last several months have been a period of considering the complex colonial legacy of their identity.