Zimbabwe

Jah Prayzah’s history… As told through the Zimbabwean griot’s best albums
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Arts, Culture and Sport Jah Prayzah’s history… As told through the Zimbabwean griot’s best albums

A roaring and smoking mbira song, one for the party animals, a Nollywood pity party to confuse the crush outside your league, and a two-season coup soundtrack – Jah Prayzah created the future by commanding the past. We look back to the career-defining moments of one of Zimbabwe’s greatest artists.

“Hip hop is an aggressive genre” – Holy Ten interview
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Arts, Culture and Sport “Hip hop is an aggressive genre” – Holy Ten interview

Holy Ten, also known as “the leader of the youths” is making a case for Hip hop as Zimbabwe’s next big genre, urged on by adoring legions of Generation Z and the decline of Zimdancehall. A belligerent artist who wastes no opportunity for beefing, he is also morally nuanced and attuned to society’s most vulnerable. He shares his creative process and influences in this interview with Onai Mushava.

“Dead White Man’s Clothes”: The language of second-hand clothes in Africa
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Arts, Culture and Sport “Dead White Man’s Clothes”: The language of second-hand clothes in Africa

Second-hand clothes carry both the individual and collective identity of their origin, that is, the fashion, style, and aesthetics. They go by different names in different parts of Africa; mitumba in Kenya, obroni wawu in Ghana, in Zimbabwe mabhero or bhero, calamidades in Mozambique, hudheey/hudeey in Somalia, abloni or sogava in Togo — these names carry the societal or cultural meanings.

When Mamvura drove the bus
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Politics and Society When Mamvura drove the bus

In this brilliant satirical piece first published in November 2017, Alex Magaisa writes about how Mamvura, a daring growth-point tramp with a mental illness did the unthinkable. Magaisa vividly paints a picture of how Mamvura took the steering wheel by surprise, warning that, “One day, a Mamvura character might drive Zimbabwe…”