Okey Ndibe

About the Author Okey Ndibe

Okey Ndibe is an acclaimed Nigerian writer, essayist and political columnist. He teaches African and African Diaspora literatures at Brown University. He is the author of Arrows of Rain and Foreign Gods, Inc. He earned MFA and PhD degrees from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and has taught at Connecticut College, Bard College, Trinity College, and the University of Lagos (as a Fulbright scholar). He has served on the editorial board of Hartford Courant where his essays won national and state awards.

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Epistle From St. James To Fellow Steakholders

Brothers and sisters, if you are or have ever been a local government councilor or chairman, a commissioner, a special assistant, a senior special assistant, a governor, a minister, an Honorable member of the House of Representatives, a Distinguished senator, a president and commander-in-chief of the Naija Armed Forces, then this epistle is for you. I bring you great tidings from my sumptuous lair in Oghara.

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Buhari, Patience Jonathan, and Theresa May

President Buhari’s silence translates as nonchalance towards his creditors, all Nigerians. Sadly, this indifference is the default, if feckless, attitude of those who occupy the space of leadership in Nigeria. These are the men and women who take the most from Nigeria but give back the least. Think about it: since assuming the presidency, has Mr. Buhari offered a serious policy statement about his country’s healthcare sector?

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Sorry, But My Country Is Ugly

What lofty and enduring dream could sprout in us when we have become accustomed to squalor, habituated to decrepitude, made our peace with detritus? What hope is there for us when we fetishise Dubai and flaunt our expensive Louis Vuitton handbags, and yet fail to realise that our country has become—is—an endless open toilet, overflowing with septic sludge? Okey Ndibe chronicles his recent visit to Nigeria, which he describes as a “nightmare”.

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Throwing a Lavish Party for the Dead

I have said this before: one of the hardest tasks is to predict how Nigerians would react in any given situation. We are a perplexing bunch, able to defy the most skilled pontificator. Imagine, then, my constant frustration. As one who has written for years on Nigerian affairs, I am often asked—both by audiences in Nigeria and abroad—to pronounce on the likely turn of events in my country of birth.

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The Revolt Of Mandela’s Grandchildren

Okey Ndibe: South Africa is in the midst—some would say the very incipient stage—of a major political and cultural revolt. One of the most remarkable things about this movement is that young people, mostly university students, are leading it. I call them Nelson Mandela’s grandchildren, but the nature and context of their ongoing struggle render that designation highly vexatious.