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Kenya: Litigation as a tool for Rastafari female liberation
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African identities Kenya: Litigation as a tool for Rastafari female liberation

As an entry point for advocacy, litigation shapes public discourse. Importantly, it addresses violations and mitigates future violations. In Kenya, the High Court upheld the rights of a female Rastafari learner. She was expelled from school because of her dreadlocks. The court pronounced that “the rule that she cuts her hair is intrusive to her religion and not justifiable in a democratic country”.

Denmark gets its first public statue of black woman, heroine Mary Thomas
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Politics and Society Denmark gets its first public statue of black woman, heroine Mary Thomas

A statue of a black queen has been erected on Danish soil, the country’s first public monument dedicated to a black woman. Two black female artists Jeannette Ehlers of Denmark and La Vaughn Belle of the Virgin Islands created the collaborative sculpture entitled I AM QUEEN MARY in honour of Mary Thomas, a black queen who revolted against the Danish.

Christian Cole: Oxford University’s first black student celebrated with a new plaque
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Politics and Society Christian Cole: Oxford University’s first black student celebrated with a new plaque

Not many know about the first black student who sat in lecture halls of the University of Oxford. The University of Oxford recently honoured Christian Cole, its first black student with a plaque. Cole was from Sierra Leone and he studied Classics, and he was called to the Bar in 1883, becoming the first African barrister to practise Law in the English courts.

Forgotten Trailblazers: The “Mères” of the Négritude Movement
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Politics and Society Forgotten Trailblazers: The “Mères” of the Négritude Movement

The revolutionary idea of Negritude turns 82 this year and the ‘trois pères’ of the movement, Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sédar Senghor and Léon-Gontran Damas, will be celebrated as literary heroes. But perhaps it is time, as Edwige-Renée Dro writes, to remember the ‘mères’ of the movement and resurrect them from obscurity.