Posts tagged patriarchy


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Nigerian churches and their role in encouraging patriarchy

“In Christ there is no male or female,” but in many churches across Africa gender inequality is the norm, which is often justified. The church has become a tool which engenders gender segregation, in support of patriarchy. Rape in marriages is hardly addressed, and women are taught to be submissive in marriage. Are churches guilty as charged? How should some of these teachings be challenged and changed? Let’s hear your thoughts on this issue.

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Uganda: Policing how women dress, what defines appropriate or decent dress code?

A Facebook post by a Ugandan student, Joaninne Nanyange, which chronicles how she was stopped from entering the Law Development Centre by two women because she was inappropriately dressed [knee length skirt] has stirred a debate on the platform. The post has divided opinion over what constitutes “appropriate dressing”, and several questions have been raised on Facebook. Questions such as how should a “proper” dress code be defined and measured, Who (should) define the decency and appropriateness of how women dress (formally and informally)? What informs institutional rules of professional attire?

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Fractured peace: Resistance and transformation in Zimbabwe

The Zimbabwean government prides itself in maintaining a police force that keeps the country safe and at peace while other countries on the continent struggle to deal with conflict and war. Recently, however, Zimbabwe has experienced a surge in citizen protests and violence. But what does ‘peace’ really mean in a society that is built on and sustained by various forms of violence, asks Vimbai Midzi.

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There’s no such thing as ‘women’s issues’

Language shapes how we see the world. The vocabulary that labels the political, legal and social impacts of discriminatory and unjust practices as ‘women’s issues’ serves to keep these issues on the periphery. We need to radically change the conversation by naming and addressing ‘women’s issues’ for what they really are: issues that exist because we live in a man’s world, says Olutimehin Adegbeye.