Public Order and Processions in Zimbabwe: Are We Paying the State to Protest?
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Politics and Society Public Order and Processions in Zimbabwe: Are We Paying the State to Protest?

In Zimbabwe, citizens are not allowed to embark on public demonstrations without the consent of a ‘regulatory authority’ of a geographic area. This involves a lot of red tape as a stumbling block. On top of that, those who wish to assemble and express themselves must pay the police. But why should ordinary citizens have to pay money to exercise a constitutional right?

Corruption and Buhari’s perfect storm
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Politics and Society Corruption and Buhari’s perfect storm

Come May 29, Nigerians will look to the “Answer” to answer about corruption. They will look for evidence that their new president has plans to jail those who, through acts of corruption, have contributed to wrecking Nigeria. They will look to him to neutralize Boko Haram. They will demand a roadmap to reliable electric power. They will want to see movement on fixing their country’s dilapidated infrastructure

Does culture preclude the right to safe sex on the continent?
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African identities Does culture preclude the right to safe sex on the continent?

Culture and tradition have long been used as a means of shutting down debate on Sexual Reproductive and Health Rights on the continent even as the most vulnerable members of our society continue to suffer because of our chronic inability to engage with these matters. The context we live in has made it clear that regional bodies can no longer ignore issues such as abortion, safe sex and violence against sexual minorities as these are issues facing the majority on the continent today

What’s really wrong with the state of journalism?
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Politics and Society What’s really wrong with the state of journalism?

The need for balanced and accurate reporting about conflict situations in Africa is more crucial than ever. Surveys done in the run-up to World Press Freedom Day showed that government repression against the media has dramatically increased the threats faced by journalists. In many cases, local journalists facing repression in Africa are the most vulnerable as they lack the support of large media houses and international organisations